our testing


Testing protocol


Countermovement Jump (CMJ)

The Countermovement Jump is broken down into a braking or eccentric phase as you lower down to the ground and a propulsion or concentric phase as you push against the ground to come upwards. The eccentric phase shows your ability to absorb power and the concentric phase shows your ability to generate power.

In this test, we measure asymmetries in the braking and propulsion phases as well as reactive strength (braking phase) and mean power (propulsion phase).

Squat Jump / Repeated Squat Jump

In the Squat Jump, the athlete starts from a static flexed knee position (in a half squat position). Asymmetries are broken down into the initiation of the upwards movement (early phase) and the end of the upwards movement (late phase) as they pushed into the ground to jump. The early phase asymmetry reflects the involvement of hip and knee joint muscles whereas the late phase asymmetry reflects knee and ankle joint muscles.

The repeated squat jump tests evaluates power endurance and how limb asymmetries change with fatigue.

Knee Extension (Quadriceps) and Knee Flexion (Hamstring) Strength

The hamstrings are the best friend to your knee joint. When the hamstrings are activated, they produce a force that opposes the type of loading that injures the knee. The quadriceps are important for your ability to absorb energy. Together, these muscles stabilize your knee. In addition to looking at the strength of your hamstrings and quadriceps, we look at how fast these muscles can make force. Your capacity to make force fast is called explosive strength and it is important for sprinting and jumping.

Isometric Leg Press

The isometric leg press is a test of your leg strength. We look at the most force you can make and how fast you can make that force. Your capacity to make force fast is called explosive strength and it is important for sprinting and jumping.


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